Historic Korn Field, site of CPI (continued)


    In 1913, in the only crash at the Korn airport, Milton Korn was killed and his brother Ed was injured. While all this was going on, a younger brother, Arlington Korn, was continually exposed to aviation. By the time he was 12 years old he knew his way around the airways, not as a pilot but he was precociously wise and knowing as a passenger.

     From 1913 until 1946 activities at the Korn airport sort of simmered down, at least as far as its public operations and public services went but Arlington Korn continued to fly, using the field as his base of operations.”
Ed would remain bothered by the tragic incident that claimed the life of his brother and stopped flying. In 1917-1918, Ed allowed a group of manual arts students to rebuild the Benoist, but apparently it was not flown. It was broken down and stored at Korn Airport in Jackson Center, Ohio.
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In 1949, Ed Korn donated his tractor biplane to the Smithsonian Institution. The Korn Benoist Type XII was restored to its original 1912 configuration by NASM in 1981-1982. The photo of the Benoist-Korn shows the airplane as it appeared upon completion of the restoration in 1982. The propeller however remains a family heirloom.

The tragedy at Korn Field stopped all activity at the place until 1946, when Arlington decided to rent out the farm and revive flight activity. He remodeled the old barn and made it into a hangar. He built another hangar to the right of the barn and at one time had 15 planes on the place, including three of his own. Joseph Hartzler was the full time instructor. One of the unique customs developed was the "shirt tail" display. When a student completed his first solo flight a piece of his shirt was snipped off and mounted on a bulletin board with his name and the date of the flight. He also became a member of the "Korn Field Pilot Club", which had numerous festivities. The airport scheduled passenger, commercial and pleasure flights. The Korn Airfield was closed down upon the death of Arlington on April 27, 1958.

It is no coincidence that Arlington’s son, Wayne, obtained a pilot’s license and occasionally flies as well.
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